Jacob Rees-Mogg, who remained loyal to the Prime Minister during the Partygate scandal, called him an “exceptional leader” who “is good at thinking what other people don’t think” – but is not Churchill.

The leader of the House of Commons told the Telegraph: ‘Churchill always had new ideas. Johnson is good at thinking things other people don’t and doesn’t just politely follow conventional thinking.

He added: “I’m not comparing him to Churchill, I’m just saying successful politicians are those who have the will to make decisions and then persuade people.”

The North East Somerset MP also said Johnson was an ‘outstanding leader’ who had ‘unlocked’ the country when others refused to do so.

Earlier this week, Rees-Mogg, 52, claimed it would take a general election if Johnson were to be ousted as prime minister.

He argued Tuesday in Newsnight that any potential successor would have to call an election to receive public support.

It comes as the Prime Minister and the Conservative Party await the findings of Whitehall Ethics Inquisitor Sue Gray’s report into ‘partygate’ and the alleged No 10 rallies that broke the lockdown.

Rees-Mogg said the Prime Minister is a

Jacob Rees-Mogg, who remained loyal to the Prime Minister during the Partygate scandal, called him an ‘exceptional leader’ who ‘is good at thinking things other people don’t’

During his interview with The Telegraph, Rees-Mogg also revealed how his wife, Helena, gave him a bracelet of hair from the Duke of Wellington’s horse, Copenhagen, for Christmas.

The Duke of Wellington rode the chestnut stallion during the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.

Rees-Mogg said he bought his wife, 45, “a little necklace” from jeweler J McCarthy Ltd in Westminster as a festive gift.

And she gave him “the most beautiful gift: a bracelet made with the hair of the mane of Copenhagen”.

Rees-Mogg had noticed it at an auction, where it was inscribed: “Wellington Loader’s Mane, Copenhagen to Waterloo.”

It is said that he said to Helena: “If you miss a present for me, this is absolutely what you need.”

Earlier this week, Rees-Mogg, 52, claimed it would take a general election if Johnson were to be ousted as prime minister.  He argued in Newsnight (above) on Tuesday that any potential successor would have to call an election to receive public support.

Earlier this week, Rees-Mogg, 52, claimed it would take a general election if Johnson were to be ousted as prime minister. He argued in Newsnight (above) on Tuesday that any potential successor would have to call an election to receive public support.

Like the Prime Minister, Rees-Mogg has a large family.

He and his wife last had a child in 2017, with the arrival of son Sixtus Dominic Boniface Christopher.

The full names of the other children are Alfred Wulfric Leyson Pius, Thomas Wentworth Somerset Dunstan, Peter Theodore Alphege, Anselm Charles Fitzwilliam and Mary Anne Charlotte Emma Rees-Mogg.

Despite having so many children, Mr Rees-Mogg previously revealed he never changed his diaper.

The following year he ruled out running to replace Theresa May as prime minister, saying he had too many children to do the job.

He admitted taking charge of No 10 would be ‘very difficult’ as he is a ‘family man’.

Rees-Mogg also revealed how his wife, Helena, gave him a hair bracelet from the Duke of Wellington's horse, Copenhagen, for Christmas.  Above is the bracelet she is supposed to have given him

Rees-Mogg also revealed how his wife, Helena, gave him a hair bracelet from the Duke of Wellington’s horse, Copenhagen, for Christmas. Above is the bracelet she is supposed to have given him

The MP for North East Somerset and his wife last had a child in 2017, with the arrival of son Sixtus Dominic Boniface Christopher.  The full names of the other children are Alfred Wulfric Leyson Pius, Thomas Wentworth Somerset Dunstan, Peter Theodore Alphege, Anselm Charles Fitzwilliam and Mary Anne Charlotte Emma Rees-Mogg (all pictured)

The MP for North East Somerset and his wife last had a child in 2017, with the arrival of son Sixtus Dominic Boniface Christopher. The full names of the other children are Alfred Wulfric Leyson Pius, Thomas Wentworth Somerset Dunstan, Peter Theodore Alphege, Anselm Charles Fitzwilliam and Mary Anne Charlotte Emma Rees-Mogg (all pictured)

The Duke of Wellington rode the chestnut stallion during the Battle of Waterloo in 1815

The Duke of Wellington rode the chestnut stallion during the Battle of Waterloo in 1815

Above is part of the Copenhagen mane - seen in 2015 - which had a pre-auction estimate of £3,000-5,000

Above is part of the Copenhagen mane – seen in 2015 – which had a pre-auction estimate of £3,000-5,000

Rees-Mogg’s thoughts come as Boris Johnson could become the first Prime Minister to be questioned under police caution after it emerged Scotland Yard was opening a criminal investigation into the pandemic lockdown parties.

News of the Metropolitan Police investigation into Partygate broke as the Cabinet held their weekly meeting in Downing Street.

Jacob Rees-Mogg came out of No 10 and headed straight for the cameras to swear loyalty to Johnson.

“The leadership of this country that Boris Johnson has had has been so brilliant that it has gotten us through this incredibly difficult time,” he said.

“He made all the big decisions well and we opened up faster than any other European country thanks to the prime minister and I’m honored to be under his leadership.”

Some Tory MPs have already publicly called for Johnson’s resignation, but others have said they will wait for the Gray report to be released before trying to trigger a vote of no confidence.

But Rees-Mogg’s Newsnight interview suggests Johnson’s supporters in the party are keen to deter any attempt by rebel Tory MPs to bring down the prime minister by pushing for a possible general election.

The leader of the House of Commons said: “I am of the view that we have moved, for better or for worse, to a predominantly presidential system and therefore the mandate is personal rather than entirely gone, and that any Prime Minister would be very well advised to seek a new term.

When asked if the Prime Minister should resign if there was a picture of him having a drink at No 10, Rees-Mogg urged people to wait for Gray’s report to be released and denounced it. which he described as “gossip” on the matter.

“Trying to speculate on gossip and chatter around the report really gets us nowhere,” he added.

Rees-Mogg’s public support for any potential Tory leader to call an election is likely the latest step in a ploy designed to help Boris Johnson maintain some stability amid the ‘partygate’ scandal threatening his premiership.